Saturday, August 23, 2014

Beautiful Sights on Long Lake

Loon Family near Elizabeth Bruening's.
Photo by Marilyn Gaizband
Here on Long Lake, near the end of Crooked Pine Drive, there is a haven for wildlife; a natural shoreline of reeds and water lilies.  Also in this area is a ten foot buffer zone of native plants between Elizabeth Bruening’s lawn and the lake.
The combination provides all the ingredients for a wonderful life, including shelter for homes, safe access to food and water, and a relatively safe recreation space.  The wildlife does, however, keep watchful eyes on the sky for the bald eagles!

Elizabeth's friend, Marilyn Gaizband (a professional photographer), came to visit her in July of this year.  Marilyn especially enjoyed the wildlife photo opportunities from Elizabeth's dock and she has graciously shared her photographs with "Long Lake Living" for all of us to enjoy.

In the slideshow below you will see two loon chicks with their parents that hatched in the nearby reeds. You will also see a muskrat family in their summer home beneath the hollow under a birch clump.  The Great Blue Heron likely raised its young in the heron rookery nearby at Dogwood and 164th.  Neighbor, Al Kiecker, gets in some early fishing as the fog lifts.  Elizabeth is a great role model for us all, keeping a natural shoreline that helps provide important wildlife habitat for the creatures who are part of our "up north" experience.
[Must have Flash installed to view this and our other slideshows.]
Some phones and tablets do not support Flash.  This is a link to the photos in this slideshow for those without Flash:  LongLakeLiving.org_Picasa Web Album_MG/EB

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Osprey and Loon Report

Good News for the Osprey Family that Nests on Hwy. 34 and North End of Long Lake

According to the Northwoods Press article by Carrie Hitchcock about our Osprey Family, next year their home base will be even broader than the narrow beam on the power pole (located at the north end of Long Lake and Hwy. 34) that they call home this summer.

(click on the article to enlarge)

Long Lake Loons

The Aquatic Vegetation Monitoring Team spotted 9 loons on the lake Wednesday, July 30th, during their morning sampling expedition. There were six adults and three chicks.  It takes a community to raise a family and that goes for loons too!  Lets all be very careful to stay clear of the loon families so the chicks are not disturbed!

Thanks to Sharon Natzel and Northwoods Press for the information in this post.

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Magazine Article Featuring LLAA Survey Results

In the spring of 2013, at the request of the Hubbard County, Minnesota, Coalition of Lake Associations (COLA), a master’s capstone class at the Indiana University School of Public and Environmental Affairs undertook a project to analyze the sustainability of both the COLA and it's individual lake associations.  Many residents of Long Lake participated in the survey for this project.

The results have been published in an article titled, "Analyzing and Improving the Sustainability of Lake Associations" by Jennifer Okajima, Jana McGee, Burnell C. Fischer, and James R. Farmer.  The Capstone Article was published in LakeLine Magazine's 2014 Summer Issue with facts and graphs utilizing the data from the survey answers of our own Long Lake residents.  LakeLine Magazine is published by the North American Lake Management Association.  To read the article click on this link:  Analyzing and Improving the Sustainability of Lake Associations_pdf

Dan Kittilson, COLA president, extended his thanks:
  “Kudos to Burney Fischer and his Indiana University School of Public and Environmental Affairs (SPEA) Capstone Masters Class for their successful accomplishments with their Capstone course and subsequent article that has been published in the LakeLine Magazine."

LLAA July 2014 Email from Arthur Howe

Yellow/Brown Crowns on your Pine Trees around Long Lake?

Wondering what is causing the yellow to reddish brown patches in the upper crown of your Red Pines, also known as Norway Pines? One of our members in Neighborhood #5 discovered this was caused by the pine bark beetle, a native MN beetle.  More than  60 trees had to be removed, from 3 properties.

The DNR Park Rapids Area Forestry was his first point of contact when he noticed reddish brown discoloration of the needles and a large amount of pine pitch on the bark of some trees.  A DNR consultant forester did further analysis with the landowner.  Then a tree service was engaged to remove the trees and safely dispose of them according to DNR guidelines, so as to not infect other pine trees:
http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/treecare/forest_health/barkbeetles

Pine Bark Beetle
We encourage you to examine your Red/Norway Pine canopy for stressed or dying Red/Norway Pine trees. If you find discolored foliage in the crown, which is often the first noticed indication of a bark beetle attack, please consult with the DNR Park Rapids Area Forestry, 607 1st Street West, Park Rapids, MN 56470, 732-3309.

For an historical study of pine bark beetles, including examples of the devastation caused in Colorado, visit:  Bark Beetle Blues

Should the weather pattern of drought conditions like the summers of 2012 and 2013 begin again, the DNR Forestry suggests using a soaker hose in the drip area of these trees, so that one inch of water would be received on a weekly basis by the tree.  Watering helps keep the trees healthy, less stressed and better able to resist the pine bark beetle.  [MN DNR Pine Bark Beetles Brochure.pdf.]  Fortunately, there has been adequate rainfall so far this summer.

Saturday, July 19, 2014

New Link to Order Trees for 2015


Take a look at our "Shore Management" page.  (Tab above.)  We have posted a new link to the Hubbard County COLA's "Restore the Shore" page.  That is where you will find the information and order forms you need to order trees and shrubs to plant in 2015.

If you have any questions contact Sharon Natzel:
218-732-5749 or email sorgwweh@aol.com.